Vegetarians Still Exist At JD

There is a lack of vegetarian meals for students at St. Joseph’s Cafe.

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Vegetarians Still Exist At JD

Saint Joseph's Cafe in the Commons

Saint Joseph's Cafe in the Commons

Chitra S

Saint Joseph's Cafe in the Commons

Chitra S

Chitra S

Saint Joseph's Cafe in the Commons

According to research by the Organization For Economic Cooperation and Development, humans around the world consume an average of 75 pounds of meat per person. If people stopped eating meat, the health of humans and the environment would be in better shape. The energy to produce one pound of meat takes more than 2000 gallons of water, and producing one hamburger use as much as fossil fuels as a small car driving 20 miles.

For reasons like this, some students at Juan Diego choose to be vegetarian. “I chose to be a vegetarian because I think it’s definitely healthier for my body and I can’t stand animals being killed,” said Senior Abraham Maguina.

For some students, it’s a matter of religion. Hindu is one example where meats like beef and pork are banned because it’s disrespectful to the cow, which is treated as a motherly god in India. Saint Joseph’s Cafe at JD has a lack of vegetarian meals, which is insufficient for students to eat a  whole meal during lunch. Offering more plant-based options in the cafeteria could definitely make lunch easier for students for eating restrictions. Students would not have to pack a home-made lunch at home or limit themselves to only eating salad everyday. Even for students and faculty who eat meat, having plant-based options offered in the cafeteria would be beneficial for their health. 

Currently Saint Joseph’s Cafe only offers only a salad bar, provided every day for students and faculty, and small, side meals along side of the large meat-based meals. For example, on Tuesday, the cafe serves mini corn dogs and chicken pot pie with a small, side meal of cheesy potatoes. Cheesy potatoes is the only vegetarian option for students, which is not even whole meal. Vegetarian students would only have the option of choosing the salad bar, offered everyday, along with the cheesy potatoes, as a side dish. 

“I think it would be nice if there were vegetarian options too. Even though I am not a vegetarian, it would be a good and a healthy change,” said Senior Kuyni Li.