Juan Diego: Behind the Times

Is reading period ready for a digital change?

eBooks+have+been+around+since+the+early+2000s+and+are+an+easy+alternative+to+having+to+carry+around+heavy+paper+books.
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Juan Diego: Behind the Times

eBooks have been around since the early 2000s and are an easy alternative to having to carry around heavy paper books.

eBooks have been around since the early 2000s and are an easy alternative to having to carry around heavy paper books.

Storyblocks.com

eBooks have been around since the early 2000s and are an easy alternative to having to carry around heavy paper books.

Storyblocks.com

Storyblocks.com

eBooks have been around since the early 2000s and are an easy alternative to having to carry around heavy paper books.

Handy, light, and saving trees. These are just a few of the benefits of eBooks over regular books. In reading period at JD, the faculty likes to make a strong point that students can choose any book in an attempt to get students to actually read. Any book, that is, except digital and eBooks. But how torn is the population of JD in choosing between allowing the handy devices and keeping them out? 

I think the question of whether or not to allow ebooks during reading break is a bit complicated,” English teacher Parker Lee says. “In a perfect world where you could guarantee that all students would use ebooks properly, I think they would be a great way to encourage reading. I do think there are a good group of students who could handle it. The problem is that many students would abuse having a digital device during reading break. It would be too easy to use those devices to do things other than read. I think the problems would outweigh the potential benefits.” 

Librarian Sharon Phelps agrees, saying, “I don’t think eBooks should be allowed during the reading break because it is just too difficult to monitor who is really reading a book on their device and who is on other sites.” The faculty seems to be generally against eBooks during reading period as it would be hard to manage which students were actually doing what they were supposed to and surprisingly, some of the students even agree. 

“I think that eBooks, in theory, could be a really good idea,” Sophomore Hayley Hickman says, “but when given to a bunch of teens who just want to use their phones during the day, they will find ways to make it a game and just mess around. Obviously not everyone would play games, but someone would ruin it for everyone.” The students already don’t always do what they’re supposed to during reading, such as talking, sleeping, and, although less of a problem this year with the new ban, being on their phones.Most people seem to be in agreement that eBooks do have their benefits. Senior Sara Slick says, “I think that eBooks could allow kids have more variety in getting books.” 

eBooks could be a good benefit, since some books aren’t available in paper copies and it’s easier to get digital books than physical ones. However, giving students eBooks would only open the window for more of what students shouldn’t be doing during that time. It will take a lot more trust between the faculty and the students about what they’re doing during reading period before eBooks are allowed to enter the auditorium.